Let’s Recap LGBTQ Pride Month 2016

With the final day of June, LGBTQ Pride Month comes to a close for 2016. The Wiley Blackwell Team hopes to serve the LGBTQ Community by continuing the much needed discussion. As a reminder, all of the curated research collections for Pride Month will be freely available through July 31.

With the final day of June, LGBTQ Pride Month comes to a close for 2016. Just last year, same-sex marriage was federally legalized in the United States. In sharp contrast, this year’s pride month was shadowed by the devastation of the Orlando shootings. We were all painfully reminded that despite great strides made by the LGBTQ community, hate and inequality still run rampant. Through this grim reality, the outpour of love and support that emerged from such a violent act of hate is a testament of hope and strength.

LGBTQ Pride 2016

Thanks for visiting us each week this month to continue the necessary discussion on LGBTQ rights and issues. As a reminder, all of the curated research collections for Pride Month will be freely available through July 31.


LGBTQ Pride Month in the News

LGBT Rights in National Constitutions – would they make a difference in the US and

OrlandoNightSkyline
The OneOrlando Fund is an official fund to provide support and relief to the Pulse nghtclub victims and their families.

globally? Huffington Post

 

‘They Were So Beautiful’: Remembering Those Murdered In Orlando NPR

Pope Francis: Catholics Should Apologize to the LGBT Community Advocate

Stonewall Inn Recognized as National Monument to Gay Rights The Wall Street Journal

 

White_House_rainbow_colors_to_celebrate_June_2015_SCOTUS_same-sex_marriage_ruling
June 26, 2015 – White House lit with rainbow colors to celebrate SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling.

Mapping the Rise of Anti-LGBT Legislation on the First Anniversary of Nationwide Marriage Equality The Atlantic’s CityLab

 

Charlotte Schools Set New Transgender Bathroom Policy The Wall Street Journal

NBA, WNBA Are First Pro Sports Leagues to March in NYC LGBT Pride Parade Rolling Stone

 


Pride on The Philosopher’s Eye

LGBTQ Rights
This collection explores the past, present, an future of LGBTQ law, politics, and activism which seeks to ensure effective change in social policy and legislation. Read more.
LGBT Family
This collection explores the complexities of social, ethical, and psychology themes of LGBTQ families and relationships, covering topics from sexual health to marriage equality. Read more.
People are people. And family is family.
Wiley Journal Publishing Manager Brian Giblin share a personal reflection on pride, identity, and coming out. Read more.
Trans Issues
Tackling complex issues that transgender and gender nonconforming people face, the collection covers topics such as cultural inclusion and representation, healthcare advocacy and treatment, institutional discrimination, violence, and many more. Read more.
stethoscope.jpg
Interview: Patient Practice for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth with Dr. Christine Aramburu Alegria. Listen now.
LGBT Awareness Banner
This collection focuses on Awareness and Education, covering a wide array of topics such as intersectionality, gender identity, and institutional inclusion. Read more.

Interview : Patient Practice for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth

In an original podcast, Wiley’s Senior Marketing Manager Kathleen Mulcahy interviews Orvis School of Nursing’s Dr. Christine Aramburu Alegría on her clinical practice article titled, “Gender nonconforming and transgender children/youth: Family, community, and implications for practice,” published in the Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

For this week of LGBTQ Pride Month, we continue our thematic exploration in Trans Issues. In an original podcast, Wiley’s Senior Marketing Manager Kathleen Mulcahy interviews Orvis School of Nursing’s Dr. Christine Aramburu Alegría on her clinical practice article titled, “Gender nonconforming and transgender children/youth: Family, community, and implications for practice,” published in the Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. Along with podcast, we have also included a transcript below.

Earlier this week we released a free collection of research articles related to a variety of transgender and gender nonconforming topics, Dr. Aramburu Alegría’s article is among this collection.

Don’t forget to come back each Monday as we post articles and think pieces from Wiley authors and LGBTQ advocates centered around a unique theme. Thanks for joining us as we continue the necessary conversation on LGBTQ rights, awareness, and support.


 


Podcast Transcript

Continue reading “Interview : Patient Practice for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth”

Trans Issues

This collection promotes awareness and exploration of gender identity and expression. Tackling complex issues that transgender and gender nonconforming people face, the collection covers topics such as cultural inclusion and representation, healthcare advocacy and treatment, institutional discrimination, violence, and many more.

Trans Issues

For the third week of LGBTQ Pride Month, we’ve selected articles from our broad journals portfolio under the theme Trans Issues. This collection promotes awareness and exploration of gender identity and expression. Tackling complex issues that transgender and gender nonconforming people face, the collection covers topics such as cultural inclusion and representation, healthcare advocacy and treatment, institutional discrimination, violence, and many more. Enjoy this research freely through July 31, and don’t forget to comment and share below.

In addition to this research collection, the Wiley-Blackwell Team has selected some of their favorite resources and history fun-facts about the trans community.

And, don’t forget to come back each Monday as we post articles and think pieces from Wiley authors and LGBTQ advocates centered around a unique theme. Thanks for joining us as we continue the necessary conversation on LGBTQ rights, awareness, and support. Continue reading “Trans Issues”

It’s LGBTQ Pride Month

lgbtq pride 2016

All people deserve to live with dignity and respect, free from fear and violence, and protected against discrimination, regardless of their gender identity or sexual orientation.

– Barack Obama in his Presidential Proclamation for LGBT Pride Month 2015

June is LGBTQ Pride Month. Celebrate with us!

Visit The Philosopher’s Eye Blog each Monday this month to read think pieces from Wiley authors and LGBTQ advocates. You’ll also get unlocked access to journal articles and book excerpts that examine the ethical, social, and philosophical issues faced by the LGBTQ community.

Join us as we continue the necessary conversation on LGBTQ rights, awareness, and support.

Happy Reading,

The Wiley Blackwell Philosophy Team

 

Closing the Question about Trans-Identities

3111086451_91879a4b16_oWas there ever a time in which a person could have argued for the moral acceptability of slavery without doing something gravely wrong in the very arguing? Maybe not, but it ever there were, it is now long, long, past; some questions are simply closed.

Questions about the validity of transpeople’s identities—of whether, e.g., transwomen are “really” women, eligible to apply to Smith College and to use women’s restroom, have been considered fair game since we emerged into public view. Whether expressed in academic prose, in political posturing, or in outright sneers, such questions are heard by many transpeople as profoundly disparaging, and sometimes menacing.

Yet if the tide of social attitudes and practices easing passages between genders keeps swelling, such debates might become as out of place as, say, a serious discussion about whether homosexuality is a mental illness. The sound you hear may be the closing of yet another question about how human beings may live together.

What I wonder about is this: in the time remaining before trans becomes just another way of having a gender, as, say, adoption is just another way of becoming a parent, is there anything that need not be disparaging, that might actually be helpful, to be said? Might it be good for transpeople to take a moment to think about whether their own understandings and practices might sometimes be politically retrograde, or to have some insight into the challenge their lives pose to how cisgender people now have to reimagine themselves?

Jamie Lindemann Nelson

The Hastings Center Report

Professor at Michigan State University

Diane Sawyer’s Interview with Bruce Jenner: What Were Its Lessons?

319px-Diane_Sawyer_2011_ShankboneDiane Sawyer’s April 24, 2015 ABC News interview with Bruce Jenner drew 16.9 million total viewers. The interview was deemed highly anticipated, as the American public, via media reports, expected to hear comments regarding Jenner’s gender identity. During the two-hour block of time, viewership increased as the interview unfolded. Jenner had been in the public eye for several decades, first as an Olympic champion in the 1970s and more recently as a reality television show regular on Keeping Up with the Kardashians. In a sense, Americans thought they knew much about Jenner leading up to this interview; however, they would learn more, such as the fact that Jenner considers himself Republican and Christian.

In reports following the event, CNBC described the two hours as “moving, touching, and affirming” and referred to Jenner as “humble, personable, and flawed.” LGBTQ advocates were generally pleased with the interview, noting that it represented an “accurate portrayal of what it means to be transgender” and did not cater to sensationalism (The Advocate). Trans woman and star of Orange is the New Black, Laverne Cox, offered caution in pointing out that Jenner’s story is “very specific” in that “most trans people don’t have that kind of privilege.” Indeed, violence against trans people, including murder, is endemic in the United States, especially for trans women of color.

Taking Cox’s point that much privilege is embedded within Jenner’s life and story (such that he is not like most trans people), and at the same time, the interview received an overall positive reception in casting Jenner as an everyday and relatable person (via descriptors such as “accurate,” “humble,” and “flawed”), what was the take-away from this interview for most American viewers? In particular, what were its lessons regarding trans experiences and identities?

Mary Bloodsworth-Lugo
Washington State University
Hypatia

We encourage you to share your thoughts and comments below. Please also read our free special collection of articles on LGBT studies now through July.

LGBTs in the workplace

Canadian Journal of Administrative Science

Call for Papers

Deadline: October 30, 2015

As the workforce becomes increasingly diverse, a lot of attention has been paid to the career issues of women and racial minorities. In contrast, comparatively little research has been conducted on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered (LGBT) people in the workplace. Maher and colleagues (2009) tracked empirical research in the LGBT domain and observed three distinct phases: Early work (1800s-1972) focused on homosexuality as a disease; the second phase (1972-1990) targeted negative attitudes towards homosexuality (e.g., combatting Homophobia, violence and discrimination against LGBTs); and the third phase (post-1990) focused on changing institutions to foster a positive climate in the workplace. Consistent with this, recent research in this domain has also shifted from employment discrimination, identity management, and career counselling for LGBT individuals (Chung, et al., 2009; DeJordy, 2008; Ragins, 2008) to countering heteronormativity in the workplace, the adoption of LGBT-friendly practices, and understanding the career choices of LGBT individuals (Chuang, et al., 2011; Ng et al., 2012; Ozturk & Rumens, 2014). The purpose of this special issue is to take LGBT scholarship to the next stage by gathering new knowledge and extending theory on LGBT individuals in the workplace.

We invite broad submissions for papers that focus on sexual orientation, gender identity and LGBT individuals within the work domain. Submissions can be conceptual or empirical (qualitative or quantitative), and review work is especially welcomed. In particular, we seek research that is thought provoking, fills a gap in the literature, or crosses boundaries particularly from critical and/or queer studies to management literature. Papers should appeal to management readers, add value through theory building, and provide implications for HRM practice for organizations and employers. We offer a list of topics below as a catalyst to encourage potentially impactful scholarship on LGBT issues in the workplace, but welcome other topics not specifically mentioned. We also use LGBT as a short hand for sexual minorities as a group, but papers can focus on one type of sexual orientation (e.g., transgendered employees) or sexual minorities collectively.

For suggestions on topics, more information on the Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, and additional resources, please click here.

Canadian Journal of Administrative Science