Let’s Recap LGBTQ Pride Month 2016

With the final day of June, LGBTQ Pride Month comes to a close for 2016. The Wiley Blackwell Team hopes to serve the LGBTQ Community by continuing the much needed discussion. As a reminder, all of the curated research collections for Pride Month will be freely available through July 31.

With the final day of June, LGBTQ Pride Month comes to a close for 2016. Just last year, same-sex marriage was federally legalized in the United States. In sharp contrast, this year’s pride month was shadowed by the devastation of the Orlando shootings. We were all painfully reminded that despite great strides made by the LGBTQ community, hate and inequality still run rampant. Through this grim reality, the outpour of love and support that emerged from such a violent act of hate is a testament of hope and strength.

LGBTQ Pride 2016

Thanks for visiting us each week this month to continue the necessary discussion on LGBTQ rights and issues. As a reminder, all of the curated research collections for Pride Month will be freely available through July 31.


LGBTQ Pride Month in the News

LGBT Rights in National Constitutions – would they make a difference in the US and

OrlandoNightSkyline
The OneOrlando Fund is an official fund to provide support and relief to the Pulse nghtclub victims and their families.

globally? Huffington Post

 

‘They Were So Beautiful’: Remembering Those Murdered In Orlando NPR

Pope Francis: Catholics Should Apologize to the LGBT Community Advocate

Stonewall Inn Recognized as National Monument to Gay Rights The Wall Street Journal

 

White_House_rainbow_colors_to_celebrate_June_2015_SCOTUS_same-sex_marriage_ruling
June 26, 2015 – White House lit with rainbow colors to celebrate SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling.

Mapping the Rise of Anti-LGBT Legislation on the First Anniversary of Nationwide Marriage Equality The Atlantic’s CityLab

 

Charlotte Schools Set New Transgender Bathroom Policy The Wall Street Journal

NBA, WNBA Are First Pro Sports Leagues to March in NYC LGBT Pride Parade Rolling Stone

 


Pride on The Philosopher’s Eye

LGBTQ Rights
This collection explores the past, present, an future of LGBTQ law, politics, and activism which seeks to ensure effective change in social policy and legislation. Read more.
LGBT Family
This collection explores the complexities of social, ethical, and psychology themes of LGBTQ families and relationships, covering topics from sexual health to marriage equality. Read more.
People are people. And family is family.
Wiley Journal Publishing Manager Brian Giblin share a personal reflection on pride, identity, and coming out. Read more.
Trans Issues
Tackling complex issues that transgender and gender nonconforming people face, the collection covers topics such as cultural inclusion and representation, healthcare advocacy and treatment, institutional discrimination, violence, and many more. Read more.
stethoscope.jpg
Interview: Patient Practice for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth with Dr. Christine Aramburu Alegria. Listen now.
LGBT Awareness Banner
This collection focuses on Awareness and Education, covering a wide array of topics such as intersectionality, gender identity, and institutional inclusion. Read more.

The Psychological Burden Associated with the Stigmatization of Homosexuality

imagesThe Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) has long focused on the psychological burden associated with the stigmatization of homosexuality and, in articles over the past decade, explored the roots of public opposition to marriage equality; examined the rights and responsibilities of gay parents; and critiqued the “psychological” arguments that are typically put forward regarding gay rights.

In “Social Advocacy for Equal Marriage: The Politics of ‘Rights’ and the Psychology of ‘Mental Health’, (Analyses of Social Issues of Public Policy, December 2004), Celia Kitzinger and Sue Wilkinson argue against the discipline’s dominant narrative regarding homosexuality, with its focus on social stigmatization and the mental health damage or deficit that such stigmatization imposes. They argued instead for a discourse of rights, which “asserts universally applicable principles of equality, justice, freedom, and dignity.” The psychological approach, by contrast, seemed fundamentally “antithetical to the conceptual framework of human rights, as a basis for social justice.”

In “The Rights and Responsibilities of Gay and Lesbian Parents: Legal Developments, Psychological Research, and Policy Implications,” (Social Issues and Policy Review, December 2008), Jared Chamberlain, Monica Miller, and Brian Bornstein enrich the discussion about how courts should deal with gay parents who chose to end their relationship. They argue that children benefit from having continued contact with two parents—even if in gay relationships there may be a biological connection to only one of the parents—and that the children’s well-being is unaffected by their parents’ sexual orientation. The same “best interest” standard that prevails among heterosexual parents in determining child custody should prevail among gay parents, with visitation rights allocated accordingly. A review of the literature reveals that children of lesbian parents showed no differences in terms of “psychological development and family functioning,” exhibited similar levels of self-esteem, and experienced similar gender identity formation processes. They concluded by urging psychologists:

to continue to conduct and publicize the results of research on children of same-sex parents, especially in new areas such as dissolution of the same sex-relationship; they can conduct research comparing families with lesbian gay and heterosexual parents; and they can evaluate children in custodial disputes that result from the breakup of same-sex relationships in the same manner that they work with the children in heterosexual divorce cases.

In “Anti-Equality Marriage Amendments and Sexual Stigma,” (Journal of Social Issues, No. 2, 2011) Gregory Herek summarizes the stigma-based analysis of anti-equality marriage laws and campaigns. He discusses how being denied the legal right to marry because of one’s orientation constitutes an instance of stigma; and being subject to political campaigns promoting anti-equality marriage amendments are a source of heightened stress for gays, lesbians, and bisexuals. The personal and political are interrelated: The initial enactment and continuing existence of anti-equality marriage laws depend on the continuing salience of such attitudes among the voting public. He closes by asking two questions: How the process of coming out and discussing one’s sexual orientation impacts one’s friends, relatives, and acquaintances; and second, how and why some heterosexual friends and family chose to become allies in the struggle for marriage equality and related structural stigma and prejudice.

Finally, Melanie Duncan and Markus Kemmelmeier focus on what attitudes fuel opposition to same-sex marriage, in their article “Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage: An Essentialist Approach.” They argue that the negative same-sex marriage (SSM) attitudes are the result of essentialist thinking about marriage—that is, thinking that categorizes marriage as universal, unique, invariant, and not the result of human agency. In fact, “essentialist” attitudes about marriage were a more potent predictor of negative SSM even than essentialist conceptions of homosexuality. In that respect, marriage is often conceptualized as if it predated or had an existence independent of the society in which it is practiced; marriage is viewed by opponents of SSM as if it had an “objective” reality, whose essence is formally enshrined. These attitudes are revealed in studies probing essentialist beliefs about homosexuality and essentialist beliefs about marriage: “Although opponents of SSM may be likely to harbor prejudices against homosexuals, their opposition to SSM seems to be more critically motivated by their essentialist perspective on marriage itself.”

We encourage you to share your thoughts and comments on this post below. If you’re interested on reading scholarly content, made free this month only to support the continuation of conversations surrounding the LGBT Community, read here.

For more from SPSSI, visit Wiley Online Library.  There you’ll find a free sample issue, content alerts, and a host of psychology articles.

LGBTs in the workplace

Canadian Journal of Administrative Science

Call for Papers

Deadline: October 30, 2015

As the workforce becomes increasingly diverse, a lot of attention has been paid to the career issues of women and racial minorities. In contrast, comparatively little research has been conducted on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered (LGBT) people in the workplace. Maher and colleagues (2009) tracked empirical research in the LGBT domain and observed three distinct phases: Early work (1800s-1972) focused on homosexuality as a disease; the second phase (1972-1990) targeted negative attitudes towards homosexuality (e.g., combatting Homophobia, violence and discrimination against LGBTs); and the third phase (post-1990) focused on changing institutions to foster a positive climate in the workplace. Consistent with this, recent research in this domain has also shifted from employment discrimination, identity management, and career counselling for LGBT individuals (Chung, et al., 2009; DeJordy, 2008; Ragins, 2008) to countering heteronormativity in the workplace, the adoption of LGBT-friendly practices, and understanding the career choices of LGBT individuals (Chuang, et al., 2011; Ng et al., 2012; Ozturk & Rumens, 2014). The purpose of this special issue is to take LGBT scholarship to the next stage by gathering new knowledge and extending theory on LGBT individuals in the workplace.

We invite broad submissions for papers that focus on sexual orientation, gender identity and LGBT individuals within the work domain. Submissions can be conceptual or empirical (qualitative or quantitative), and review work is especially welcomed. In particular, we seek research that is thought provoking, fills a gap in the literature, or crosses boundaries particularly from critical and/or queer studies to management literature. Papers should appeal to management readers, add value through theory building, and provide implications for HRM practice for organizations and employers. We offer a list of topics below as a catalyst to encourage potentially impactful scholarship on LGBT issues in the workplace, but welcome other topics not specifically mentioned. We also use LGBT as a short hand for sexual minorities as a group, but papers can focus on one type of sexual orientation (e.g., transgendered employees) or sexual minorities collectively.

For suggestions on topics, more information on the Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, and additional resources, please click here.

Canadian Journal of Administrative Science