500th Anniversary of the Reformation: Who is remembering? and why?

StephenBrowncropped-300x300The year 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s promulgation of his 95 Theses. Commemorated worldwide as the beginning of the Reformation, this event was both the result of, and a catalyst for wider-ranging social, political, and religious developments. The waves from Wittenberg reached far beyond the borders of Germany, marking not only what became the Lutheran tradition but also the wider Christian community, including the Roman Catholic Church, whose identity was forged in this 16th-century confrontation.

“What does it mean to look at the events century from the perspective of women as active participants? Were Luther’s anti-Jewish writings…aberrations of his later years, or…a central element of his theological thought?”

Meanwhile, the Reformation was an event embedded in global history, coinciding with changes in trading patterns and economic activity, the confrontation between the Ottoman and Hapsburg empires, the beginnings of the colonization of the Americas, Africa and Asia, and the “Christianization” of Europe, reflected in the expulsion of Muslims and Jews from the Iberian Peninsula.  Anniversaries such as that of the Reformation prompt the question “What is being remembered?” What does it mean to look at the events century from the perspective of women as active participants? Were Luther’s anti-Jewish writings, which exercised such a nefarious role, especially in his German homeland in the 20th century, aberrations of his later years, or, as some researchers now suggest, a central element of his theological thought?  Commemorations also prompt us to ask, “Who is remembering?” and why. Only in 1617 did the publication of Luther’s 95 Theses a century earlier begin to be celebrated as the foundational event of the Lutheran Reformation, amid a looming conflict with the Catholic powers that would erupt the following year in the Thirty Years’ War. Since then, Reformation anniversaries have often been moulded by contemporary interests and concerns, prompting the reflection: how will future historians look back on the 2017 commemoration?

* Dr Stephen G. Brown is editor of The Ecumenical Review published by Wiley on behalf of the World Council of Churches (www.oikoumene.org).

 

Read the issue on the Reformation from The Ecumenical Review

How to Get Published in the Humanities: The Wiley Humanities Festival

There’s no question that research can change the world – and great research can come from scholars from any background and any academic discipline. Last year, Wiley launched the first Wiley Humanities Festival to explore the myriad ways that the Humanities matter and are vital not only to research and academia, but to life.. The infographic below is a snapshot of the success of last year’s festival.

The Wiley Humanities Festival is back again this year and we’re focusing on you, the researcher! The main event of this year’s festival is our FREE webinar, Humanities Publishing 101, (September 7 at 10amEST/3pmGMT) which aims to help early career researchers navigate the unwritten rules of publishing in the Humanities.

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Register now and join us on September 7th to learn how to get your research published!

If you have any questions regarding the webinar or festival, please contact me, Josh Hendrick, Humanities Research Marketer at jhendrick@wiley.com or leave a comment below.

The first ever #WileyHumanitiesFest Has Begun

The first ever Wiley Humanities Festival has begun! Visit http://www.wileyhumanitiesfest.com to see the lineup and experience the festival.

The first ever Wiley Humanities Festival has begun! Visit www.wileyhumanitiesfest.com to see the lineup and experience the festival.

wiley humanities festival
Attend the online Wiley Humanities Festival September 8 to 9, 2016!

We’ll be giving away many prizes throughout the event, so be sure to share with friends using #WileyHumanitiesFest on Twitter and Facebook, and comment extensively on the festival site.

Find out why thought leaders in philosophy like David S. Oderberg (Editor of Ratio), Sally Scholz (Editor of Hypatia), Willem B. Drees (Editor of Zygon: Journal of Religion and Sciences), Chris Higgins (Editor of Educational Theory), Ethan Kleinberg (Editor of History and Theory), Clara Fischer and Shelley Park (Guest Editors of upcoming special issues of Hypatia) find value in the humanities, and what they say is next for philosophy.

Recap: American Philosophical Association Eastern Meeting 2016

This year’s APA Eastern meeting didn’t disappoint. From January 6-9th, philosophers flocked to chilly Washington, D.C. to actively further the study of philosophy in meetings, presentations, and receptions.

The Wiley Blackwell team was there to aid in that mission. We enjoyed meeting you and discussing anything and everything philosophy – from Hannah Arendt to dualism to how you can get published at Wiley. Thank you to those who came by to say hello!

We hope you were able to come by our booth to meet our editors, and to check out the latest in books and journals. If you weren’t able to make it – don’t worry! We’ll be at APA Pacific and look forward to seeing you there.

Until then, here’s our APA Eastern 2016 recap.

// Wednesday, Day 1

Our APA experience was kicked off with an afternoon APA Commmittee Session on “The Analytic Tradition and Chinese Philosophy”, co-chaired by Linyu Gu and Chung-Ying Cheng, both editors of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Six speakers were present to discuss questions such as, “Is philosophy culture-bound?” Heavy weights such as Gary Mar and Michael Beaney commentated.

The evening was chock-full of fascinating sessions, one of which was hosted by the International Society for Chinese Philosophy, the topic being “Unearthed Texts and Ancient Chinese Philosophy.” Again, esteemed editor Chung-ying Cheng served as chair. Eight speakers debated Zhuangzi, Laozi, Zisi, Mengzi, and more.

Just next door, the Society for Applied Philosophy hosted a session on “Current Ethical and Justice Issues in Higher Education”, chaired by Harry Brighouse. Speakers contemplated the place of the humanities in a liberal society, the future of philosophical research on higher education, and more, with Gina Schouten commentating. (For further reading on applied philosophy, please browse the Journal of Applied Philosophy.)

// Thursday, Day 2

Our second day at APA was all about Carol Gould, editor of the Journal of Social Philosophy. We hosted a “Meet the Editors” coffee and tea reception at our booth, where many stopped by to meet Carol, Josh Keton (also of the Journal of Social Philosophy), Marissa Koors (Wiley Blackwell books), and Fifile Nguyen (representing this very blog!). Philosophers from all career stages came by to chat about how to get published in our journals, books, and blog.

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Then, Carol rushed off to be awarded the APA’s 2015 Gittler Prize at the prize reception for her book Interactive Democracy: The Social Roots of Global Justice. Huge congratulations to Carol on this achievement. She truly is one of the world’s best thought leaders on justice and human rights.

At the same time, Wiley’s Marissa Koors participated in a publishing workshop, speaking about the publishing process via a Q&A with other leading publishers such as Cambridge University Press, De Gruyter, Routledge, and more. If you missed it, here are her top three tips on getting published:

  1.  It’s always a good idea to send a query to an editor before submitting your book proposal. The editor can often tell you directly if the book you’re writing is a good fit for their publishing program.
  2. Do some research into each publisher’s backlist in philosophy, and be able to argue why they are the best fit for your book where possible. You will stand out.
  3. High quality content will always speak for itself, regardless of the age or tenure status of its author.

The evening also featured a session by the International Society of Chinese Philosophy on “Confucianism and the Yijing”, again chaired by Chung-ying Cheng of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Nine speakers presented papers on sub-topics ranging from “Body and Sensation in Yijing Tradition” to comparing The Yijing to Ernst Cassirer’s Philosophy of Symbolic Forms.

// Friday, Day 3

Friday provided plenty of time for philosophers to roam the exhibit hall. Our booth featured key new books in philosophy from Wiley Blackwell, as well as our extensive philosophy journals portfolio. There was much interest around Bill Irwin’s latest book, The Free Market Existentialist: Capitalism without Consumerism:

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And, as always, copies of the latest issues in Wiley Blackwell philosophy journals were available for free:

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We also asked, “What you think is the future of philosophy?” We got some great entries – check them out in our next blog post!

That evening, the APA hosted a reception to fête its new blog, which will offer an inside look at the APA, job market advice, and more. Give it your support by reading it here.

// Saturday, Day 4

Our last day started off with a session hosted by the Society for Applied Philosophy on “Parental Rights and Responsibilities” chaired by Jake Earl and commentated by Colin Macleod. Three speakers discussed “regulating biological parenting”, “parents and dependent children”, and more.

We spent the last few hours of APA in the exhibit hall, selling books and giving away our last journal copies. Folks got their last chance to speak with our acquisitions editor, and then we closed up shop to make our way back to the Wiley office in Boston.

 

More Questions from Wiley’s Migration Webinar Roundtable

Demonstration against Syrian Govt - BanyasLast Friday, I was thrilled to have Dr. Serena Parekh, Dr. Immanuel Ness, and Dr. Reenee Singh join me for an hour long webinar discussion on the Syrian refugee crisis and the wider implications of global migration.

The three panelists discussed the refugee crisis in terms of children’s welfare, globalization, media coverage and bias, government aid, and the impact of these types of crises on families. Parekh, Ness, and Singh all made insightful points. Dr. Parekh discussed the relationship between concepts of statehood and boundaries, and how borders become permeable in our digital age and are a form of exclusion – harmful to human rights. Dr. Ness pointed out that government aid from neighboring countries and the countries of the UN is great, but there should also be a burden of aid on the countries that are forcing refugees to leave in the first place. And Dr. Ness shared her experiences as a family therapist in helping families address new the culture in which they are now living, and how to manage the stress of new multicultural lifestyles.

I want to thank our panelist for an impactful discussion. During the roundtable, we answered a few questions from our listeners, but we didn’t manage to answer them all. Below are two more questions from our listeners, answered by our panelists.

How are the receiving local authorities handling the pressure of such influx and are they readily equipped? -Marjory, Student, South Africa

IN:  Destination countries have a range of policies on migration, depending on labor skill, population shortage, and causes of population shifts.  In the European context today, the passage of migrants is creating political pressures on the governments in the Balkans and in Eastern and Central Europe, due to growing xenophobia against foreigners of Muslim dissent.  We are even seeing growing nationalism in Germany, with the growth of the right-wing social movement, Pergida.  In response, tensions are rising and government leaders are scrambling to arrive at coherent policies through imposing border control or persuading sending countries to create safe havens for refugees.

Can you speak to the cultural shock and differences that arise between refugees and the nationals of the hosting country? – Mary, PhD Candidate, Canada

IN: Those refugees who have traveled as far as Europe are likely to have higher levels of education and skills and often the same religious traditions.  Eastern European leaders have permitted the migration of Catholic and Eastern Right emigres from Syria but are reticent to allow Muslims to enter and settle in their countries.  However, Germany was a recipient of tens of thousands of Turks in the post-war years who filled job shortages, and many stayed permanently and have been absorbed into the national fabric of the country.   The new wave of migrants are refugees, and may also contribute to the economic expansion of Central and Eastern European economies.  However, it is also possible that they could tighten labor markets and work for lower wages, expanding unemployment and the reserve army of labor.

RS:  Refugees suffer from what Renos Papadopoulos would describe as ‘nostalgic disorientation’ which is about missing the sights, sounds and smells of home.  Everything in the host country can seem strange and confusing. Many refugees do not come from welfare states and do not know how such complex systems in the Western world work.  This is compounded with language difficulties. Sometimes, one family member (often the man) can remain loyal to their country of origin while women, especially women with children, tend to adapt more quickly to the host county.  Children will often take on the roles of translators and cultural guides for the families, creating inversions of gendered and generational roles. Further, the notions of how ‘the family’ is constructed and what constitutes mental health, problems and their treatment varies greatly from one culture to another. Refugees may experience the lack of fit between their belief systems and those of the host country.

Keep checking back on the Philosopher’s Eye next week, where we will be posting two more blogs from A.M Findlay, editor of Population, Space and Place, and Antipode.

Samantha Green, Marketing Manager, Wiley MA candidate in Children’s Literature, Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science

Beyond Reality: The Limits of Understanding

Beyond reality

From trees to houses, atoms to stars, we assume our senses and instruments reveal the truth about the world. But could our picture of reality be radically incomplete? Is this hocus pocus best reserved for fools and philosophers, or does it open a world of infinite potential? Watch the debate with the mathematical physicist Roger Penrose, the award-winning novelist Joanna Kavenna and post-modern philosopher Hilary Lawson: Beyond Reality.

Deadline Extended for Nominations to the Cunniff-Dixon Physician Award

cunniff-dixon-award-new-2014With a graciously extended deadline, there’s still time to nominate physicians to the Cunniff-Dixon awards.  Do you have a physician whose patient care is exemplary?

The aim of The Hastings Center Cunniff-Dixon Physician Awards is to foster those skills and virtues by providing financial prizes to those physicians, young and old, who have shown their care of patients to be exemplary, a model of good medicine for other physicians, and a great benefit in advancing the centrality of end-of-life care as a basic part of the doctor-patient relationship.

There are five annual prizes totaling $95,000; one prize of $25,000 for a senior physician; one prize of $25,000 for a mid-career physician and three prizes of $15,000 for early-career physicians. http://physicianawards.com/